Author: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols

You can’t keep quiet when you’re hacked anymore

One of the dirty little secrets of many businesses, perhaps even most, is that far more of them than ever admit to it have been hacked. Still others end up paying ransomware, but they've never revealed this deep, dark secret. After all, who wants to admit to the world — and their customers — that they've been caught with their security pants down.

Well, things are about to change. In the recently signed $1.5 trillion government funding bill were new cybersecurity laws requiring companies to quickly report data breaches and ransomware payments

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Do svidaniya, Kaspersky — goodbye

Companies and governments have, shall we say, interesting relations. Just ask any Chinese tech company in recent days.  But, while they're losing billions, companies in war-mongering countries like Russia have an even harder row to hoe. How can Russian companies support Russia's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine?

You may say they can't, but that just shows you haven't studied history. When money and ethics are weighed against each other, money usually wins. For example, such American-as-apple-pie-and-baseball companies as General Motors, Ford, Coca-Cola, and IBM supported Nazi Germany during World War II.

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Do svidaniya, Kaspersky — goodbye

Companies and governments have, shall we say, interesting relations. Just ask any Chinese tech company in recent days.  But, while they're losing billions, companies in war-mongering countries like Russia have an even harder row to hoe. How can Russian companies support Russia's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine?

You may say they can't, but that just shows you haven't studied history. When money and ethics are weighed against each other, money usually wins. For example, such American-as-apple-pie-and-baseball companies as General Motors, Ford, Coca-Cola, and IBM supported Nazi Germany during World War II.

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Phishing e-mails are more prevalent (and dangerous) than ever

After Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, it’s time to hunker down

After Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, it’s time to hunker down

Will World War III begin in cyberspace?

People die because of cyber wars, even if no bullets are ever fired. Instead, they die in emergency rooms that no longer have power, from broken medical communication networks, and from riots. All of this has happened before. It will happen again. And now, with Russia poised to invade Ukraine and Russian cyberattacks already in motion, we can only hope and pray that what promises to be the first major European war since World War II doesn't spark the next World War.

If it does, I fear the proximate cause won't be Russian T-90 main battle tanks trying to smash their way into Ukraine's capital, Kyiv. It will be the Russian GRU Sandworm hacking group launching a cyberattack that perhaps wrecks the European Union power grid; or knocks out major US internet sites such as Google, Facebook, and Microsoft; or stops 4G and 5G cellular services in their tracks.

To read this article in full, please click here

Will World War III begin in cyberspace?

People die because of cyber wars, even if no bullets are ever fired. Instead, they die in emergency rooms that no longer have power, from broken medical communication networks, and from riots. All of this has happened before. It will happen again. And now, with Russia poised to invade Ukraine and Russian cyberattacks already in motion, we can only hope and pray that what promises to be the first major European war since World War II doesn't spark the next World War.

If it does, I fear the proximate cause won't be Russian T-90 main battle tanks trying to smash their way into Ukraine's capital, Kyiv. It will be the Russian GRU Sandworm hacking group launching a cyberattack that perhaps wrecks the European Union power grid; or knocks out major US internet sites such as Google, Facebook, and Microsoft; or stops 4G and 5G cellular services in their tracks.

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Why are your IT people so miserable? Log4j2itis

Instead of holiday toasts, do you hear screams and moans from your server room? Are your IT people sobbing inconsolably even when Amazon Web Services (AWS) is running? Do you walk over sleeping system administrators and developers when you get to the office?

If that's happening to you, let me explain what’s happening. Your IT people — a lot of IT people — are suffering from Log4j2itis.

You may have seen some general news about it over the last couple of weeks, as even general news sources are picking up that it's bad news. As Jen Easterly, director of the the US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), said: "The Log4j vulnerability is the most serious vulnerability I have seen in my decades-long career."

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Ransomware is a threat, even for the smallest of businesses

If I’ve heard it once, I’ve heard it a million times: “My business is too small for a cyber crook to bother with me.” Oh, my friend you are so, so wrong. No company is too big or too small for a ransomware dealer to come knocking at your virtual door.

A recent report from Webroot, The Hidden Costs of Ransomware, found the vast majority—85%—of managed service providers (MSPs) have reported attacks against small and midsized businesses (SMBs). Despite that appallingly high number, just 28% of SMBs consider ransomware a worry.

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