AuthorWoody Leonhard

Microsoft yanks buggy Office 2016 patch KB 4018385, republishes all of this month’s patch downloads

As I reported yesterday, the July 2018 Windows and Office patches teem with bugs. We’re just beginning to see the fallout.

The July 3 non-security Office 2016 patch KB 4018385 is officially yanked. If you don’t recall KB 4018385 — a small patch in a sea of Office fixes — the original KB article describes it thusly:

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Microsoft yanks buggy Office 2016 patch KB 4018385, republishes all of this month’s patch downloads

As I reported yesterday, the July 2018 Windows and Office patches teem with bugs. We’re just beginning to see the fallout.

The July 3 non-security Office 2016 patch KB 4018385 is officially yanked. If you don’t recall KB 4018385 — a small patch in a sea of Office fixes — the original KB article describes it thusly:

To read this article in full, please click here

Patch Tuesday problems abound, Server 2016 crashes, and a .Net patch goes down in flames

You know it’s going to be an Alice in Wonderland month when some sites report that Microsoft plugged 54 vulnerabilities on Patch Tuesday, while others report 53. Fact is, patching has become so brutal — and so banal — that there’s no consensus on counting, much less on what’s good and bad.

Suffice to say that, once again this month, there was a huge number of security patches (129 individual patches, according to the Microsoft Update Catalog), with no pressing security fixes unless you’re using the Edge browser or Internet Explorer. Microsoft changed Win10 version 1803 to “Semi-Annual Channel,” but the term now means less than it ever has before. If that’s possible.

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Get the Microsoft June patches applied, but watch out for Win7 NICs and old antivirus

Windows 7 customers should be on the lookout for a couple of, uh, challenges this month, as the Win10 1803 trail of tears continues and Win10 1709 finally looks pretty solid.

The Win7/Server 2008R2 network card bugs continue

First, the good news. If you installed last month’s Win7/Server 2008R2 patches and your network connections didn’t go kablooey, you’re almost undoubtedly OK to proceed with this month’s patches.

On the other hand, if you’ve been waiting to install patches on your Win7 or Server 2008R2 machine, you need to be aware of a bug that Microsoft has acknowledged. It was introduced by a patch back in March, according to the KB articles, and hasn’t been fixed yet:

To read this article in full, please click here

Get the Microsoft June patches applied, but watch out for Win7 NICs and old antivirus

Windows 7 customers should be on the lookout for a couple of, uh, challenges this month, as the Win10 1803 trail of tears continues and Win10 1709 finally looks pretty solid.

The Win7/Server 2008R2 network card bugs continue

First, the good news. If you installed last month’s Win7/Server 2008R2 patches and your network connections didn’t go kablooey, you’re almost undoubtedly OK to proceed with this month’s patches.

On the other hand, if you’ve been waiting to install patches on your Win7 or Server 2008R2 machine, you need to be aware of a bug that Microsoft has acknowledged. It was introduced by a patch back in March, according to the KB articles, and hasn’t been fixed yet:

To read this article in full, please click here

Microsoft Patch Alert: Some bugs in Win 10 (1803) fixed, others persist

Microsoft's patches in June took on some unexpected twists.

Windows 7 owners with older, 2002-era Pentium III machines got their patching privileges revoked without warning or explanation (and a documentation cover-up to boot), but there’s little sympathy in the blogosphere for elderly PCs.

Win10 1803 was declared fully fit for business, a pronouncement that was followed weeks later by fixes for a few glaring, acknowledged bugs — and stony silence for other known problems.

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Big Win10 1709 patch reinforces twice-a-month patching pace but, oddly, nothing new for 1803

Microsoft’s Windows 10 patching pace is so fast at this point that one Patch Tuesday doesn’t cover all the bases. Instead, we’re seeing one massive Cumulative Update on Patch Tuesday, and a second — typically large — grab bag of patches later in the month.

You have to wonder what’s happening, though, when Microsoft can deliver its second bundle of patches for 1709, 1703 and 1607 before the second patch for the latest version, 1803, sees light of day.

The Win10 patches

KB 4284822 for Win10 1709

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Make sure Windows auto update is temporarily turned off, and watch out for SMBv1 fixes

In May, we saw a host of bugs introduced by the Patch Tuesday “security” patches. By the end of the month, patches for those patches killed almost all of the bugs – even the inability of Win10 version 1803 to run on certain kinds of solid-state drives, including the one in some Surface Pros.

We also saw Microsoft push Win10 version 1803 onto machines that were specifically set to avoid it. I haven’t seen any official response to Microsoft’s inquiry into the reports, but we now have a sighting of a Win7 machine being pushed onto Win10, in spite of its settings.

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May Windows and Office patches are now relatively stable, but Win7 NIC problems persist

At least the really bad bugs, introduced by “security” patches earlier this month, have been fixed. The problems that remain reside in the dregs — not likely to bite, but worth knowing about in case something suddenly goes bump in the night.

And if you’re using Win10 1803, you should definitely ask Microsoft for an increase in combat-duty pay. 

The ongoing Win7/Server 2008 R2 patching threat

Remember when Win7 was relatively stable? OK, OK; “stable” is a relative term that’s unlikely to apply to any version of Windows, but you know what I mean. Win7 and Server 2008 R2 have gone through months of problems with networking in general, and apoplectic network interface cards in particular.

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Microsoft Patch Alert: Major bugs introduced in May fixed, plenty of problems remain

Once more we have a monthly Windows/Office patch scorecard that needs a guidebook. Or two. And we just got a handful of buried warnings about problems in old patches, plus a brand new way to fry your network interface card.

Thus continues the tradition of two cumulative updates per month for all of the supported Windows 10 versions – that’s eight cumulative updates in total – in addition to bobs and weaves and a very long list of acknowledged bugs introduced by recent security patches in Windows 7.

Conflicts with Remote Desktop

The strange behavior of the CredSSP update – where the Patch Tuesday fixes for all versions of Windows seemed to break Remote Desktop Protocol with a strange error message: “This could be due to CredSSP encryption oracle remediation” has been resolved.

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