AuthorLucas Mearian

How blockchain will underpin the new trust economy

Over the next two years, enterprises are expected to ramp up their efforts to test blockchain technology as part of a new method of establishing trust in a digital economy.

New research from consultancy Deloitte LLP shows a "trust economy" is now developing around person-to-person (P2P) transactions enabled by blockchain technology and not dependent on more traditional methods such as credit ratings or guaranteed cashier's checks.

"Rather, it relies on each transacting party's reputation and digital identity – the elements of which may soon be stored and managed in a blockchain," Deloitte analysts said in a report.

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The best mobile threat defense is mobile threat detection

As enterprises push ahead with mobile-first strategies – and employee smartphones and tablets increasingly becoming business tools – the importance of mobile threat defense (MTD) is growing.

Using mobile threat detection and defense, however, is no small task; the technology must cover applications, networks and device-level threats to iOS and Android phones and tablets to be effective.

"We talk about mobile threat defense, rather than detection – the reason being these solutions not only detect, but also can prevent and remediate threats," said Dionisio Zumerle, research director for mobile security at Gartner.

The MTD market is growing in terms of adoption, and has started to attract attention from endpoint protection platform (EPP) vendors and in other related markets, according to a recent report from Gartner.

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The top 5 problems with blockchain

While blockchain appears ready to upend business processes and trust models across a myriad of industries, it's still in its early days and the various iterations of the distributed ledger already in use are far from vetted.

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(Insider Story)

What is blockchain? The most disruptive tech in decades

Blockchain is poised to change IT in much the same way open-source software did a quarter of a century ago. And in the same way that Linux took more than a decade to become a cornerstone in modern application development, Blockchain will take years to become a lower cost, more efficient way to share information between open and private networks.

But the hype around this seemingly new, secure electronic ledger is real. In essence, blockchain represents a new paradigm for the way information is shared and tech vendors and companies are rushing to figure out how they can use the distributed ledger technology to save time and admin costs. Numerous companies this year have been rolling out pilot programs and real-world projects across a variety of industries - everything from financial services to healthcare to mobile payments.

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What is blockchain? The most disruptive tech in decades

Blockchain is poised to change IT in much the same way open-source software did a quarter of a century ago. And in the same way that Linux took more than a decade to become a cornerstone in modern application development, Blockchain will take years to become a lower cost, more efficient way to share information between open and private networks.

But the hype around this seemingly new, secure electronic ledger is real. In essence, blockchain represents a new paradigm for the way information is shared and tech vendors and companies are rushing to figure out how they can use the distributed ledger technology to save time and admin costs. Numerous companies this year have been rolling out pilot programs and real-world projects across a variety of industries - everything from financial services to healthcare to mobile payments.

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FinTech builds on blockchain for international mobile payments

IBM has partnered with a Polynesian payments system provider and an open-source FinTech payment network to implement a new international exchange based on a blockchain electronic ledger.

The new payment network uses IBM's Blockchain Platform, a cloud service, to enable the electronic exchange of 12 different currencies across Pacific Islands as well as Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

KlickEx Group, a United Nations-funded, Pacific-region financial services company, and Stellar.org, a nonprofit organization that supports an open-source blockchain network for financial services, are backing the new cross-border payments service.

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In iOS 11, toggling Wi-Fi and Bluetooth ‘off’ doesn’t work. Here’s why.

Apple users have unwittingly discovered a new feature after installing iOS 11 on their mobile devices: when you toggle your Wi-Fi and Bluetooth quick settings to "off" those services remain on for Apple services.

For example, Location Services is still enabled, and Handoff and Instant Hotspot stay on, even when iPhones and iPads are put in "Airplane Mode."

The change in iOS 11 has come under criticism because it could expose users to security risks.

Because iOS 10 allowed users to perform a quick swipe in the Control Center to toggle Wi-Fi and Bluetooth fully off, users reasonably believe they had the same capability in iOS 11.

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Machine learning-based threat detection is coming to your smartphone

Part of a growing trend, MobileIron announced today that it is adding machine learning-based threat-detection software to its enterprise mobility management (EMM) client, which it said will help address an increase in mobile attacks.

The Mountain View, Calif.-based company said it has partnered with Zimperium, a maker of machine learning-based behavioral analysis and threat detection software that monitors mobile devices for nefarious activity and apps.

MobileIron said it will integrate Zimperium's z9 Engine software with its security and compliance client. The software will reside on users' iOS or Android smartphones or tablets, and it will also become a part of IT administrators' EMM control consoles. That upgrade to MobileIron's EMM client will "automate the process of detecting and responding to mobile threats," MobileIron stated.

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