Author: Lucas Mearian

IT salaries aren’t keeping up with inflation — but that may soon change

Pay for some IT professionals is failing to keep up with inflation, according to a salary survey by IT employment consultancy Janco Associates for calendar year 2021. But preliminary data indicates pay for tech workers could soon change drastically with job market in IT tight, and many companies eyeing major tech projects in the year ahead.

With inflation in the US running at about 8% over the past year, salary increases — even for IT execs — have failed to keep pace.

The mean compensation for all IT pros last year rose only 2.05%, with the median salary at $100,022 for those at large enterprises and at $95,681 for IT workers at mid-sized firms, according to Janco.

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Duckduckgo launches privacy browser beta for macOS

Privacy-centered search engine DuckDuckGo today launched the beta of its desktop browser for macOS.

The browser is designed from the ground up to maintain privacy, the company said, meaning it will not collect information about users and will not install cookies or tracking codes on devices. DuckDuckGo also said it can block “hidden trackers” before they load.

Duckduckgo first announced plans for a macOS desktop browser in December 2021. (The browser is already available as a download for mobile devices). In 2019, DuckDuckGo added Apple Maps support and has since made  other improvements to how it works on Apple devices.

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Q&A: CISO sees ‘enterprise’ browser as easier way to monitor employee web use

Over the past several years, Ashland Specialty Chemicals, a global specialty materials and chemical company with about 4,200 employees, has been downsizing. It shuttered its physical datacenter and adopted more of a software-as-a-service strategy for business apps such as Salesforce and Workday. With the shift to the cloud, the company also had to address keeping web traffic secure as its hybrid workforce accessed sensitive data online.

While the company continues to use more traditional, and costly, firewalls such as Cloud Access Security Brokers (CASB) and Secure Access Service Edge (SASE) to secure web gateways, it has also been testing an enterprise-specific browser from a start-up company named Island

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Q&A: CISO sees ‘enterprise’ browser as easier way to monitor employee web use

Over the past several years, Ashland Specialty Chemicals, a global specialty materials and chemical company with about 4,200 employees, has been downsizing. It shuttered its physical datacenter and adopted more of a software-as-a-service strategy for business apps such as Salesforce and Workday. With the shift to the cloud, the company also had to address keeping web traffic secure as its hybrid workforce accessed sensitive data online.

While the company continues to use more traditional, and costly, firewalls such as Cloud Access Security Brokers (CASB) and Secure Access Service Edge (SASE) to secure web gateways, it has also been testing an enterprise-specific browser from a start-up company named Island

To read this article in full, please click here

Start-up emerges with an ‘enterprise browser’

A start-up has emerged from stealth mode to announce what it describes as one of the world’s first enterprise-specific browsers, capable of governing how users interact with all SaaS and web applications.

The new Island web browser is based on the widely used Chromium open-source platform. Launched by a company with the same name, Island offers users a familiar online experience while governing what sites they can visit, the data they can view, and what files they can download or upload. Restrictions can be dialed up or down and can be specific to a user’s role in an organization.

For example, a user could be surfing the web with the standard Chrome, Edge, or Safari browsers, but if they try to access a site that's off-limits based on the Island settings, they'd be blocked and told to use their secure browser. The Island browser can even stop an employee from taking screenshots of sensitive data, depending on the settings IT admins choose to implement.

To read this article in full, please click here

Start-up emerges with an ‘enterprise browser’

A start-up has emerged from stealth mode to announce what it describes as one of the world’s first enterprise-specific browsers, capable of governing how users interact with all SaaS and web applications.

The new Island web browser is based on the widely used Chromium open-source platform. Launched by a company with the same name, Island offers users a familiar online experience while governing what sites they can visit, the data they can view, and what files they can download or upload. Restrictions can be dialed up or down and can be specific to a user’s role in an organization.

For example, a user could be surfing the web with the standard Chrome, Edge, or Safari browsers, but if they try to access a site that's off-limits based on the Island settings, they'd be blocked and told to use their secure browser. The Island browser can even stop an employee from taking screenshots of sensitive data, depending on the settings IT admins choose to implement.

To read this article in full, please click here

Microsoft beefs up Edge’s security against zero-day attacks

In the latest release of its Edge beta, Microsoft introduced a new way for IT admins to better secure the Chromium-based browser against web-based attacks.

The release notes for Microsoft Edge Beta Channel describe the new security features as employing several techniques to guard against so-called zero-day exploits; Zero-day exploits are software or network vulnerabilities developers are unaware of, and so they’ve not been patched.

Imagine if the keylock mechanism on your home’s backdoor was faulty and jiggling the doorknob released the latch. Burglars could walk door to door looking for that particular vulnerability and jiggle doorknobs until one opened. Zero days are the same concept, but in cyberspace.

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Microsoft beefs up Edge’s security against zero-day attacks

In the latest release of its Edge beta, Microsoft introduced a new way for IT admins to better secure the Chromium-based browser against web-based attacks.

The release notes for Microsoft Edge Beta Channel describe the new security features as employing several techniques to guard against so-called zero-day exploits; Zero-day exploits are software or network vulnerabilities developers are unaware of, and so they’ve not been patched.

Imagine if the keylock mechanism on your home’s backdoor was faulty and jiggling the doorknob released the latch. Burglars could walk door to door looking for that particular vulnerability and jiggle doorknobs until one opened. Zero days are the same concept, but in cyberspace.

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Microsoft touts first PCs to ship natively with secure Pluton chip

As organizations continue to wrestle with how to manage a hybrid workforce, security outside the corporate firewall continues to play a huge role in day-to-day IT operations.

Following the October release of Windows 11, which boasted features aimed at enabling hybrid work, Microsoft last week announced the first PCs with its Pluton chip-to-cloud security technology. The technology is aimed at securing the computers of remote workers and others.

At CES, Microsoft announced that Lenovo and chipmaker AMD have launched the first laptops — the ThinkPad Z13 and ThankPad Z16 — that come natively with the Pluton security chips. Pricing for the ThinkPad Z13 starts at $1,549, pricing for the ThinkPad Z16 starts at $2,099. Both laptops will be available in May and Lenovo said there is no additional cost associated with the Pluton chip inside.

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Privacy-centric DuckDuckGo to release Mac desktop browser

Popular, privacy-centered search engine DuckDuckGo plans to launch a desktop browser for macOS laptops and desktops.

The browser is designed from the ground up to maintain privacy; that means it will not collect information about users and will not install cookies or tracking codes on devices. The company also claims it can block “hidden trackers” before they load.

DuckDuckGo’s search engine is already available as a download for mobile devices. In 2019, DuckDuckGo added Apple Maps support and has since added other improvements to how it works on Apple devices.  

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